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20100901
20100930
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 50 (some duplicates have been removed)
mentioned earlier the sensation of going to canada and what it felt like to be in that place in canada and in other opportunities to be in that land in ireland. i wonder if you can reflect and margaret as well, what were the physical experiences you were having and what was the importance ever going to the place by way of informing your story? >> i don't know if anybody seen there is a series on now on called african-american lives? >> yeah. >> and it remindses me so much of my experience and some of the things that were said that rang through for me are things like, if we don't know where we come from we don't know that we are somebody. it's like, the effects of colonization when -- when our story is taken from us. in when our language is taken and we are disoriented and we come to a new country, we are not literate, it's a way to keep people oppressed. so, part of reclaiming ourselves as irish americans and having the biggest life possible means knowing everything there is to know about ourselves and our people. >> i will talk briefly about the going to saint john i set that trip
-month journey across the united states and lower canada. i document this tore on a map that i painted for the project and also from previous projects called the road map to lost america. on the map i have taken all of the contemporary borders off the map and replaced them with native territories, and then overlaid it with contemporary highways. i have scheduled venue stops at different areas along the tour, from california to south dakota, that will serve as headquarters for my local research. when i was researching the traveling medicine show, i came across this. they had put out an elixir, and it referred to the elements that came out because of the high stress, high-pressure life, mostly because of the industrial revolution. anyway, i was fascinated by the term american-itis, and i thought it did a lot about the stress-related illnesses, and i was impressed that they picked up on that and the 1800's. i did a survey to see if it was irrelevant element today. i have a series of eight painted banners that are retellings of american history. i am particularly interested in transition h
a degree celsius to as much as two or three degrees celsius and that's in central or west canada. so, we have seen quite a warming over the period of our professional lifetimes. let's go to the next one. further more, if you simply play a sort of a thought experiment which my coleague mike has done here for the landscape of the united states, and what he's done is taken a census of precipitation, day by day every event that's occurred over along period, and he's cataloged how many of those events occurred where temperatures were in the range of minus 3 degrees celsius, just below freezing and freezing and what's shaded on here is the fraction of time for a given location in which the precipitation has occurred in that temperature range. that's a range of what we might call vulnerability because if temperature rises by three degrees celsius, all of the sudden we're not snowing anymore we're raining. you can think of this as a flood vulnerability map or a potential loss of snowstorm or the western problem as you can see and particularly areas like the west slope of the sierras and the casc
, and a significant reinvestment in media. we spend $400,000 a year. that is $1.37 for everyone in the room. canada, $20. england, $80. that is how much they spend, and they are the country that are on the top of the list for healthy as democracies. we have to get our priorities straight. to bail out a.i.g., $565 a person. maybe a couple of dollars for public media is a bargain. >> so speaking of public funding for media, glenn fanrkle, you have been a correspondent for the "washington post" and you have also been based in london. let's take the bbc model. there are funded by a tv license fee that is charged to the public. whoever can get the bbc, pays for the bbc. would something like that work in the u.s.? >> first of all, the bbc has a great model. i also think we need to remember what journalism is. journalism, among other things, has to be independent, somewhat autonomous, had to have the ability to report things that people do not want to see. whether they are government, organizations, powerful individuals. my second time and the london bureau chief was it during the iraq war. the bbc had so
. a good idea is a good idea. i'm not in any category. that is not the canada. i'm running. i'm running for the people. whatever the people want that will best serve district 10, that's what i'm for. >> thank you. mr. morris. >> i'm on the communities site. i'm on the city's side. if you do not identify yourself, somebody identifies you for you. been helping lower class families lower their utility bills. i run the neighborhood newspaper for the longest serving neighbor newspaper in san francisco. i am raising my family in san francisco in potrero hill. unfortunately, in san francisco , we tend to want to label people one way or another, and it blocks us from making solutions. i hear people saying they want the same things. i have not met any conservatives in the city. i have met people who are raising their families, who want to have a job, and want a clean and safe environment. i think we need to get beyond labels. we need to get action and get things done. thank you. >> mr. smith. >> outside of san francisco, they look at this place as 47 square miles surrounded by reality. i would p
been key for rde- listing the canada goose, which had been very endangered not long ago. this is one of very few animals in the country that has seen this kind of success. we hope you will see that with other species including the field had trapped -- fieldhead trout. this will filter any runoff before it enters the river itself and will improve recreational opportunities for folks throughout central california, including the bay area and modesto. it is only 90 minutes away. i want to encourage you to support the project and thank you for talking through the project today. president crowley: any questions? i will entertain a motion to fund. vice president vietor: i have a question. i have been having a problem understanding -- shut that thing off. >> sorry. vice president vietor: help me understand why we are acquiring this land. i mean, are we in the business to acquire lands for wildlife preserves ta? >> in this case, we are going to provide less than 10% of the funding for it to be protected long term, in perpetuity. our role is finite. hopefully, that deal will complete. we are p
throughout the united states and canada. to view personal stories of individuals, their families, and friends dealing with the disease of addiction visit aetv.com/intervention. everyone with alcohol and drug addiction is in the same boat. with treatment you can find solid ground. for drug and alcohol information and treatment referral for you or someone you know, call 1-800-662-help. drug and alcohol addiction, you lose your way. but there is a way out. you can find direction, find support, treatment, find yourself and your life, your direction home. for drug and alcohol treatment referral for you or someone you know, call 1-800-662-help. [music] if someone you know needs help for a substance use disorder, where do you turn to find treatment? the substance abuse treatment facility locator was created just for this purpose. it is a searchable directory of more than 11 and a half thousand treatment programs around the country that treat alcoholism, alcohol abuse, and drug abuse problems. the locator searches for the facilities in the nearest city or address that you specify and displays maps sh
now more than ever. thank you. >> it is hard not to want to stand up. i'm the only district in canada it to have collected 1000 signatures to put my name on the ballot. i did that would be helpful folks in this audience. we all know that san francisco is a city of neighborhood. each neighborhood takes special pride. each one has a t-shirt. i can tell you that because i have bought them. in order to lead a district as diverse as district 10, you need to understand the neighborhoods and their very special characters, and honor those things. and then you have to find commonalities. the district has unique problems. many of them have to do with development. all of us want a stifafe street. all of us want a job. let's find a way to have a common solutions. >> i'm tempted to ask a follow up. mr. smith. >> yes, steve brings up a good point. i travel all around district 10. there is a common thread that combines all. we always want to know --j" schools going to be open? are there going to be jobs? is there going to be adequate housing? that is what everybody wants. i do not care where you are
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 50 (some duplicates have been removed)